Lesson 367 – Mechanics – Punctuation – Commas

Use a comma after a conjunctive adverb or phrases like for example, in fact, or for instance used to join two main clauses. Common conjunctive adverbs are therefore, nevertheless, moreover, consequently, furthermore, besides, then, thus, instead, accordingly, otherwise, so, yet, still, hence, however. Example: Jill knew she could not win; nevertheless, she kept running.
Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.
1. The trip was wonderful; in fact everyone raved about it.
2. Will wants a promotion; therefore he is working overtime.
3. I do not believe a word he says; otherwise I would listen to his presentation.
4. You seem to be well-qualified; however your price is too high.
5. Your goals are unclear to me; so I will not vote for you.
–For answers scroll down.

Answers:
1. The trip was wonderful; in fact, everyone raved about it.
2. Will wants a promotion; therefore, he is working overtime.
3. I do not believe a word he says; otherwise, I would listen to his presentation.
4. You seem to be well-qualified; however, your price is too high.
5. Your goals are unclear to me; so, I will not vote for you.

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from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2016/02/lesson-367-mechanics-punctuation-commas.html

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